Maps

Maps of Waters Upton and surrounding places

1600s

Waters Upton area, 1670

This is an extract from a map of Shropshire dating from around 1670. Originally created by Richard Blome, the plate appeared in a volume entitled England Exactly Described which was published in 1715 by Thomas Taylor. Waters Upton is shown amidst other villages and hamlets, with the towns of “Wellynton” (Wellington) and Newport to the south-east and north-east respectively.

Original image from Richard’s Flickr photostream; modified and used under a Creative Commons licence.

1830s

map - Waters Upton area, 1833 OS

This is a combination of extracts from two early Ordnance Survey maps printed in 1833 (southern section here and northern section here). Details of roads, tracks, watercourses, woodlands and buildings can be seen, and all the settlements are named. Cold Hatton and Cold Hatton Heath to the north, Rowton to the west, Moortown to the south-west and Crudgington, with Crudgington Green, to the south all lie within the extensive parish of High Ercall or Ercall Magna. Great Bolas, along with Meeson, are situated in the parish of Great Bolas or Bolas Magna.

This work is based on data provided through www.VisionofBritain.org.uk and uses historical material which is copyright of the Great Britain Historical GIS Project and the University of Portsmouth. It is used under a Creative Commons licence.

1880s to 1920s

To view large scale Ordnance Survey maps (six inches to the mile) covering Waters Upton and surrounding parishes, as surveyed and printed in the 1880s, the first decade of the 1900s and (in some cases) the 1920s, visit the National Library of Scotland website.

1940s

Waters Upton area, 1947

This is an extract from an Ordnance Survey map printed in 1947 (full map here) and shows almost exactly the same area as in the previous map extract. For the most part the area appears to have changed very little. Lower House, Harebutt Bank and The Terrill have appeared since 1833 (with the latter two places named in the census returns of the 1800s and 1911). The most obvious change is the addition of the railway, which has of course disappeared since this map was printed thanks to the infamous Dr Beeching.

This work is based on data provided through www.VisionofBritain.org.uk and uses historical material which is copyright of the Great Britain Historical GIS Project and the University of Portsmouth. It is used under a Creative Commons licence.

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